Spring Flowers :: Top 10 Picks

Spring flowers have begun to bloom now that winter is almost over and the days are getting longer…finally! Do you look forward to the awakening garden with the first colors of spring like I do?

red tulip yellow tulip bleeding heart hyacinths

After a long winter, brightly colored blooms begin to push their way up through the moist soil.

They becoming beacons of color that are soon followed by robins hunting for worms, leaves sprouting on trees, and rich shades of green that blanket the earth.

Wait, wait, wait! It isn’t spring, it is only mid-August. If you dream of having beautiful spring flowers in the spring, then now is the time for action!

August – September: Shopping and planning

Late September – Early November: Planting

Spring: The Fruits of your labor…a beautiful burst of color and fragrance!

Many of the “early birds” of spring( spring flowers ) are grown from bulbs. If you are new to planting bulbs, than you are will be pleasantly surprised because this is one of easiest ways to bring color to your garden and yard. Flower bulbs that bloom during the spring need to be planted in the fall.

You should be done about 6 weeks before the ground freezes or when the ground temperature falls below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Bulbs need to be planted in soil that drains well. Dig a hole and place the bulb with the pointed end facing up. Cover the bulb with soil and water well. If you live in an extremely cold climate, mulch can be placed over the flower bulbs to keep them protected during the harsh winter.

Do nothing else…wait for spring…..and enjoy the blooming color!

Spring Flowers – - Top 10 List

Flower Picture Pick of the Day

Gardening Tips:

Winter Storage Some bulbs and plants for spring planting are not winter hardy in all areas in the country and will not survive if left in the ground or outdoors year round.

Remove these plants from your garden in the fall and store them indoors until the following spring. After the danger of frost has passed in the spring, replant them in your garden or move their pots outside for another season of beautiful blooms. This takes a little work and some storage space, but is actually quite simple.
1. Dig the tender plants or bulbs from your garden just before the first frost.
2. Dry them for a few days in a frost-free location. Then remove any remaining foliage and excess soil and move them indoors.
3. Store in a cool, dry and dark place for the winter. Some will benefit from being stored in peat moss or sand and others prefer to be stored in a warm location.

1. Snowdrop/Galanthus nivalis: The snowdrop has the distinction of being one of the earliest bulbs to bloom, sometimes while snow is still on the ground! The small delicate bell-shaped flowers are white and tipped with green. They grow 8-12 inches tall and look beautiful when grown in clumps around the base of a tree or mailbox, or scattered throughout the lawn.

Since they are small, plant many of them to create a pleasing effect. The bulb will naturalize easily and prefers cool moist soil and a semi-shady or full sun location. They are a sure cure for the winter blues! Hardiness Zones: 4-8

2. Spring Snowflake: This flower is very similar to Snowdrops as it blooms in early spring and naturalizes easily in colder climates. The plant grows 6-10 inches tall and bears fragrant white bell shaped blooms.

It prefers a damp location, sandy/humus rich soil, and will thrive in full sun or light shade. It can be grown in containers, rock gardens, and of course under trees and shrubs. This easy care plant will guarantee that spring is on the way! Hardiness Zones: 4-8

3. Winter Crocus/Crocus tommasinianus: The Winter Crocus as its name implies, bloom very early in the spring. It grows 3-5 inches tall and comes in a variety of colors to include: white, yellow, purple, mauve, and bronze. The small cup shaped spring flower has 6 petals with a three spiked orange stamen. Winter Crocus prefer a cold, sun-dappled environment (needs more sun exposure in extremely cold areas) and will naturalize easily in lawns and rock gardens. These little “gems” will brighten your yard!
Hardiness Zones: 5-9

4. Dutch Crocus/Crocus vernus: The extremely popular Dutch Crocus blooms in early spring, about 2 weeks after the Winter Crocus appear. Dutch Crocuses are available in a rainbow of colors to include: purple, white, blue, mauve, yellow, and several striped varieties are also available.

Semi-shade is appropriate in most areas but the flower does need a sunny location to promote blooming in extremely cold climates. Plant in large drifts in well-drained soil for a bold splash of color, or plant a handful under trees, in planters, or in rock gardens. Dutch crocuses naturalize very easily and require very little care. A must-have for your spring garden!
Hardiness Zones: 3-9

5. Daffodil/Narcissus: The word Daffodil is almost synonymous with the word spring. This gorgeous flower blooms early to mid-spring depending on the variety. They come in creamy white, bi-color, and all imaginable shades of yellow and gold. Daffodils grow up to 18 inches tall, are easy to maintain, naturalize easily, and can be grown indoors and out. Plant in full sun or light shade. They truly are a gardener’s best friend!
Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Dutch Gardens, Inc.

Spring Flowers schedule

Plan….Buy…..Plant….Enjoy!

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